All tagged drawing

Drawing A Still Life

If you want to learn how to draw, you have to draw from life. Learning how to draw a still-life or how to approach drawing from life in general can be a bit stressful and even a little boring at times but there's no way around it. Once you start getting the hang of it, though, you'll start noticing great improvements in your drawing skills that are well worth the effort!

Creating a Character Turnaround Sheet

A turnaround model sheet of your character can be a very useful tool. Animators and comic artists use turnaround model sheets to help them stay on-model as they draw characters from different angles and in varying poses. You can also use your turnaround sheet as a reference to create a maquette of your character.

Setting Up A Still Life

Creating your own still life is an excellent way to begin painting/ drawing from life. You can also treat it as a photoshoot and build your own reference library. This same method can be used for a life drawing setup. Just use a person instead of an object!

Transferring With A Grid

Using a grid transfer instead of projecting or tracing a reference gives your finished piece a more organic and unique look. The grid helps you stay close to your reference without making you feel forced to recreate it perfectly. 

Sketching With Tracing Paper

Tracing paper is a great cheap alternative to a light box or light table. Tracing paper saves you the trouble of having to redraw something from scratch as you explore and develop ideas. It allows you to easily composite an image together, taking and adding elements easily without forcing you to commit to anything. It can also be used to create a clean version of a final sketch which can be transferred onto another surface or scanned to work with in a digital medium. 

Transferring With Graphite Paper

Using graphite paper can be really useful when you want to create something that's very realistic or if you're ready to color over a finished sketch. The graphite paper will allow you to transfer your image onto a clean sheet of paper with very minimal effort. 

Create Your Own References

I used to think setting up a still life or taking reference pictures required some kind of unknown skill or sorcery that only professionals and wizards had access to. Once I went to college, though, I found it only takes a blanket, some interesting objects/ model, and some lights. It’s not mysterious or complicated and it doesn’t take more than a bit of effort on your part (and maybe also the help of a friend). 

Draw From Life

I don’t draw realistic stuff. I need to spend my time figuring out what my style is. I need to spend time getting better at drawing cartoons/manga/original characters/etc. because I want to be an illustrator/animator/painter/etc. Drawing realistic stuff is a waste of my time.

Draw/Paint Self-Portraits

One of the most challenging exercises I had to do for my first painting class was a series of 20 self-portraits. We had to do one every night for 20 days in a row. It was challenging because I didn’t know what I was doing, it took at least twenty minutes to set up all my oil painting stuff every night, and I went on vacation for a few days in the middle of these 20 days. It’s a good thing I went to Mexico on a bus and not a plane. The airport would not have appreciated my jar of gunky turpenoid very much (because it’s toxic and flammable).